Get to Know an Editor in Attendance: Misty Williams of Fiery Seas Publishing

Screen Shot 2017-01-31 at 8.44.46 PM.pngEditor Misty Williams founded Fiery Seas Publishing in 2014. She has over ten years experience from writing to marketing and publicity to editorial. As the publishing house owner, she now uses the things she has learned over the years to help build the companies growing number of authors. Fiery Seas is looking for well-written manuscripts that have been polished to shine. “We want wonderfully written manuscripts that grab the reader and will not let go, with a strong hook and plot that merge together flawlessly and characters we never want to leave behind. We are looking for anything from romance to edge-of-your-seat suspense.”
 
Misty is always looking for a great book that will keep readers up all night. She is actively seeking for mysteries, thrillers, horror, science fiction, fantasy, young adult, middle grade, romance, and historical fiction.
 
You can find her on twitter at @misty_williams_

Misty accept manuscripts of the following lengths:

  • Novelette: 10,000-35,000 words
  • Novella: 35,000-60,000 words
  • Novel: 60,000 words and up

Formats:
Novelettes and Novellas will be available in eBook only.
Novels will be available in eBook and print.
 

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Get to Know a Presenter in Attendance: Chuck Sambuchino of Writer’s Digest Books

Screen-Shot-2014-01-08-at-1.09.19-PMChuck Sambuchino (chucksambuchino.com, @chucksambuchino) is the former longtime editor of Guide to Literary Agents as well as the Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market (both Writer’s Digest Books). His authored books include Formatting & Submitting Your Manuscript; Create Your Writer Platform, which was praised by Forbes.com; and How to Survive a Garden Gnome Attack, which was optioned for film by Sony. During his past time at WD Books (through 2017), he oversaw one of the biggest blogs in publishing: the Guide to Literary Agents Blog. He is a freelance editor who has seen dozens of his clients get agents and/or book deals, and he has presented at more than 140 writing conferences and events over the past eleven years.

At the workshop, Chuck will be presenting the session “How to Get a Literary Agent: The Best Advice on Finding and Pitching Reps for Your Work.”

Tips For Pitching Your Book at the 2017 AWW

If you are coming to the 2017 Alabama Writing Workshop, you may be thinking about pitching our agent-in-attendance or editor-in-attendance. An in-person pitch is an excellent way to get an agent excited about both you and your work. Here are some tips (from one of this year’s instructors, Chuck Sambuchino) that will help you pitch your work effectively at the event during a 10-minute consultation. Chuck advises that you should:

  • Try to keep your pitch to 90 seconds. Keeping your pitch concise and short is beneficial because 1) it shows you are in command of the story and what your book is about; and 2) it allows plenty of time for back-and-forth discussion between you and the agent. Note: If you’re writing nonfiction, and therefore have to speak plenty about yourself and your platform, then your pitch can certainly run longer.
  • Practice before you get to the event. Say your pitch out loud, and even try it out on fellow writers. Feedback from peers will help you figure out if your pitch is confusing, or missing critical elements. Remember to focus on what makes your story unique. Mystery novels, for example, all follow a similar formula — so the elements that make yours unique and interesting will need to shine during the pitch to make your book stand out.
  • Do not give away the ending. If you pick up a DVD for Die Hard, does it say “John McClane wins at the end”? No. Because if it did, you wouldn’t buy the movie. Pitches are designed to leave the ending unanswered, much like the back of any DVD box you read.
  • Have some questions ready. 10 minutes is plenty of time to pitch and discuss your book, so there is a good chance you will be done pitching early. At that point, you are free to ask the agent questions about writing, publishing or craft. The meeting is both a pitch session and a consultation, so feel free to ask whatever you like as long as it pertains to writing.
  • Remember to hit the big beats of a pitch. Everyone’s pitch will be different, but the main elements to hit are 1) introducing the main character(s) and telling us about them, 2) saying what goes wrong that sets the story into motion, 3) explaining how the main character sets off to make things right and solve the problem, 4) explaining the stakes — i.e., what happens if the main character fails, and 5) ending with an unclear wrap-up.

Get to Know Writing Day Workshops Coordinator Jessica Bell

Screen Shot 2017-01-15 at 12.15.26 AM.pngJessica Bell is the executive coordinator of Writing Day Workshops, which organizes one-day writing conferences. These events take place mostly in the U.S., but can happen elsewhere.

If Jessica could choose only one creative mentor, she’d give the role to Euterpe, the Greek muse of music and lyrics. This is not only because she spends most of her time in Athens, Greece, but because of her life as a 30-something Australian contemporary fiction author, award-winning poet and singer/songwriter/guitarist, whose literary inspiration often stems from songs she’s written.

She started as a poet, drawing from her musical background and etching her thoughts and feelings into verse. Those stanzas soon turned into sentences and paragraphs, and eventually into published books. Her literary voice is said to overflow with “lyrical descriptions, unique metaphors, tight dialogue, and an abundance of sensory detail.” She has also been told she has the ability to take a seemingly ordinary three-chord type story and turn it into a main stage event.

In addition to her novels about unique dysfunctional families, poetry collections, and her best-selling pocket writing guides (Writing in a Nutshell series), she has published a variety of works in online and print literary journals and anthologies, including Australia’s Cordite Review, Writer’s Digest, and the anthologies 100 Stories For Queensland and From Stage Door Shadows, both released through Brisbane, Australia’s, eMergent Publishing.

One of Jessica’s proudest moments was when, in November 2013, her poem, Sugar (which was published in a poetry anthology called Women’s Work, edited by Libby Hathorn) was broadcast on ABC National Radio’s Poetica program.

Jessica Bell is the Publisher of Vine Leaves Press, and she makes a living as a Book Cover Designer for indie authors, and an editor/writer for English Language Teaching publishers worldwide, such as Pearson Education, HarperCollins, Macmillan Education, Education First and Cengage Learning.

As of October 2016, she is the singer of Keep Shelly in Athens.

To see a list of awards click here.